M. E. Baird: Elegant songs of sorrow

May 2, 2016

 

BANGALOW musician M. E. Baird's music mixes rock, ballads, folk and soulful blues in his new album, Fall.

Critically acclaimed by Rolling Stone Magazine, Rhythms Magazine and other media before its release, Baird is heavily influenced by art, cinema and literature, making his music a cinematic vignette with flashes of elegance and tragedy.

 

In 2010 under the 'nome de plume' of Lionel Lee's Curse, M.E. Baird released a critically acclaimed full-length album entitled Mysteries of The Heart; Vagaries of The Mind. Happy with the positive reception by critics, M. E. Baird is counting the minutes to perform the album live locally. “It will be a full band, with a double bass, drums, slide guitar and there will be some mandolin work, so despite the venue is only a small space, it will be a five piece," he said. 

 

The musician said some of the songs were written in the studio, while recording in 2014, but the other half were written during a six month period before going into the studio.“I wrote some songs with a totally different feel in mind but just before and while recording I had four family members pass away during an 18-month period," he said. "Everything was altered. I'd do a day of recording and then my nephew, who was like my younger brother, died. It took us a couple of months to sort that out, then we would go back to record another couple of songs, and then my father, my mother and my sister died in this chain of events."

 

The artist acknowledges the outcome of the album was heavily influenced by this tragedy, particularly the first single, Full of the Devil. "I didn't think it at the time, but it must have influenced it because I can't remember the days in the studio," he said.

 

The album was put aside by Baird and he was not going to release it, so he wrote a second album, a more uplifting one. He presented the second album to Footstomp Music and when they requested any other unreleased work of his, he showed them the demos for Fall. “I thought Fall would be really hard to promote because they are not happy songs." His first solo music project in 20 years, Baird had no hopes this project would have a final outcome. "My expectations were so low for this project because people would be scared by the story behind it, but the best reviews have said that the record isn't sad, and that's made me very happy."

 

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